GO ON, BE BRAVE

When you are terrified while making important decision, you must consult your companions.

One says, ‘This is too much for you’. The other says, ‘Go on, be brave’. At that moment, your doubts grow.

In that time of anxiety, you need to think and see yourself in the future. You must also see the people who will benefit or be harmed by your attitude. Of course, you do not want to cause pointless suffering to anyone, but nor do you want to abandon the path you are on.

It’s all up to you to allow the decision to reveal itself.

If you have to say ‘yes’, you should say it bravely. If you have to say ‘no’, you should say it without a trace of cowardice.

DREAMS AND THE WAY FORWARD

Brave men have dreams.

Their dreams carry them forward.

But they never make the mistake of thinking that the way is broad and the gate wide.

They know that the Universe functions in a seemingly magical process of transformation and creation.

So the best advice they keep is: ‘concentrate and disperse your energies according to the situation.’

THE BATTLE IS NOT THE SAME AS THE QUARREL

The philosopher Lao Tzu says of the journey of the warrior of light.

‘The Way involves respect for all small and subtle things. Learn to recognise the right moment to adopt the necessary attitudes.’

Even if you have already fired a bow several times, continue to pay attention to how you position the arrow and how you flex the string.’

‘When a beginner knows what he needs, he proves more intelligent than an absent-minded sage.’

‘Accumulating love brings luck, accumulating hatred brings calamity. Anyone who fails to recognise problems leaves the door open for tragedies to rush in.’

‘The battle is not the same as the quarrel.’

A GRAIN OF TRUTH

A warrior of light shares his world with the people he loves.

He tries to encourage them to do the things they would like to do but for which they lack the courage; at such times, the Enemy appears holding two wooden signs in his hand.

On one sign is written: ‘Think about yourself. Keep all the blessings for yourself, otherwise you’ll end up losing everything.’

On the other sign, he reads: ‘Who do you think you are, helping other people? Can’t you see your own faults?’

A warrior knows that he has faults. But he knows too that he cannot grow alone and thus distance himself from his companions.

Therefore, he throws the two signs to the floor, even if he thinks they may contain a grain of truth. The signs crumble into dust, and the warrior continues to encourage those nearest him.